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Vintage Saxophone Mouthpieces

Over the years, we have collected some quite rare Vintage Saxophone Mouthpices, which form part of our mouthpiece museum. Click each Mouthpiece to view a larger image.

JACK HEYWORTH MATCHED PAIR Saxophone mouthpieces [Black]

Jack Heyworth Matched Pair mouthpieces were inspired by the old Whyte and Mackays scotch advert with the black and white dogs, and are extremely rare. While looking quite lithe and and slim in design the interior evinced a huge wide walled tone chamber which gave a truly resonant tone, centred by the effect of the metal bands on the tenons.

JACK HEYWORTH MATCHED PAIR Saxophone mouthpieces [White]

Jack Heyworth Matched Pair mouthpieces were inspired by the old Whyte and Mackays scotch advert with the black and white dogs, and are extremely rare. While looking quite lithe and and slim in design the interior evinced a huge wide walled tone chamber which gave a truly resonant tone, centred by the effect of the metal bands on the tenons.

JOE CROSSMAN and BEN DAVIS Saxophone mouthpiece

Joe Crossman and Ben Davis mouthpieces, with solid silver inlay on the facings, are fine examples of a technique and standard of workmanship hardly seen today. Both had large ballooned out tone chambers, typical of pre war designs, with facings, or lays, that had much closer tip openings than today.

The silver inlays were a hangover from the wooden mouthpiece days when the lay had to be 'held' in a substance that obviously moved when both wet and warm. Nevertheless it also offered a more precise clear-cut tone than just finishing in ebonite. These mouthpieces are extremely valuable items today.

JOE CROSSMAN and BEN DAVIS Saxophone mouthpiece

Joe Crossman and Ben Davis mouthpieces, with solid silver inlay on the facings, are fine examples of a technique and standard of workmanship hardly seen today. Both had large ballooned out tone chambers, typical of pre war designs, with facings, or lays, that had much closer tip openings than today.

The silver inlays were a hangover from the wooden mouthpiece days when the lay had to be 'held' in a substance that obviously moved when both wet and warm. Nevertheless it also offered a more precise clear-cut tone than just finishing in ebonite. These mouthpieces are extremely valuable items today.

BEN DAVIS Saxophone mouthpiece

Ben Davis and Benny Carter metal mouthpieces are metal versions of the mouthpieces previously described with silver inlay. Both these saxophonists were extremely active in Hollywood and the American Jazz scene. Equally they kept abreast of modern developments and trends. Here the sound changed due to the mouthpieces being made from castings, which rendered the surface texture very hard. This in its turn affected the tonal quality.

BENNY CARTER Saxophone mouthpiece

Ben Davis and Benny Carter metal mouthpieces are metal versions of the mouthpieces previously described with silver inlay. Both these saxophonists were extremely active in Hollywood and the American Jazz scene. Equally they kept abreast of modern developments and trends. Here the sound changed due to the mouthpieces being made from castings, which rendered the surface texture very hard. This in its turn affected the tonal quality.

SELMER SOLOIST METAL Saxophone mouthpiece

The Selmer Soloist Metal mouthpiece is the famous original soloist design, but in short shank length, as the change in the stack design had not yet influenced modern designs. As a consequence the crook was a little longer, but importantly, the bore design of the instrument was different to the modern instrument that we now know.

BRILHART METAL Saxophone mouthpiece

The Brilhart Metal mouthpiece was a real rock and roller design with high shelved off chamber and baffle. It looks considerably longer to the previous mouthpieces as we no longer have the short shank, but a much more elongated chamber and tenon that fits a modern instrument and its intonation scale.

BRILHART TONALIN Saxophone mouthpiece

The Brilhart Tonalin mouthpiece was an extremely well loved mouthpiece design that had a gentle rolling baffle and shaped walled tone chamber. This resulted in a full rich sound that was particularly appealing to the genre of styles at that time. The tonal results were magnified by the use of plastics in the material from which it was made whereas using Ebonite would have dulled the sound character too much.

ROC Saxophone mouthpiece

The ROC mouthpiece was trying to create a Beebop type sound with the use of a V shaped tone chamber and an undercut baffle; the intention was to fill out the sound with the undercut baffle but then over centre it with the V shaped chamber, giving it also more punch and attack.

STREAMLINE Saxophone mouthpiece

Not much is to be found out about the Streamline mouthpieces but, interestingly one sees the new style 'built in' ligature that was later used by the English maker Lawton.

MARTIN Saxophone mouthpiece

The Martin mouthpiece is a real 'old style' mouthpiece design with long flat lay, yet close tip opening and huge ballooned out tone chamber. It works brilliantly on the old style saxophone but is a complete disaster if used on a modern instrument.

CONN ADJUSTABLE PITCH Saxophone mouthpiece

With just a simple screw ring at the base of the tenon CONN enabled the player to tune and adjust the mouthpiece without all of the pulling and shoving on the crook cork that usually played havoc with the read position and ligature.

SELMER SOLOIST D MODEL Saxophone mouthpiece

The Selmer Soloist mouthpiece was made out of solid ebonite rod and there was a time when untouched D model 'soloist' mouthpieces were fetching $1000 in NEW YORK. Such was the trust in this mouthpiece that after deleting it for many years from their catalogue Selmer was forced to bring it back to the market place. This one is a short shank original as new condition.

SELMER SOLOIST C* Saxophone mouthpiece

The Selmer Soloist C* model mouthpiece was exactly similar to the D model, but with the much closer C* lay, this mouthpiece was the favoured classical model, to use for symphonic and quartet work, for many years. The other model favoured by classical players was the B *model; now almost impossible to find in usable condition.

WOODWIND COMPANY NEW YORK Saxophone mouthpiece

This famous American company produced mouthpieces of great quality in what they termed 'steel ebonite'. They were valued because there was no dreaded rattle in the sound, they started championing tone chambers somewhat similar to Link and Meyer. Clarinettists used their mouthpieces prior to the availability of the prized Chedeville ones. The company was later bought by Leblanc.

VANDOREN PERFECTA Saxophone mouthpiece

Vandoren have always used inviting names and terminology for their mouthpieces and this short shank style mouthpiece with its round tone chamber was the ultimate in pure traditional sound. Nevertheless many Saxophonists still meddled with it, by expanding the chamber in an effort to find their own special sound.

SELMER CIGAR CUTTER Saxophone mouthpiece

The Selmer Cigar Cutter mouthpiece was produced for the Saxophone of the same name by Selmer. Interestingly it had a tone chamber very close to a modern Otto Link although still evinced the closer facings that were fashionable at the time (1930's). This is the Cigar Cutter Alto Saxophone mouthpiece.

SELMER CIGAR CUTTER Saxophone mouthpiece

Well! here it is: one of the biggest mouthpieces made for baritone and a unique hardly known design, evincing leanings towards a Link style tone chamber. No doubt a trip to the orthodontist was advisable before taking on this monster. Notice the baffled sides to enable easy entry to the embouchure. Realistically it was extremely comfortable to play as was the Bass saxophone mouthpiece also.

PROTOTYPE LAWTON Saxophone mouthpiece

Thanks to professional colleagues we obtained this prototype unfinished Lawton mouthpiece. It is interesting as a contrast to the finished designs that became famous from a truly remarkable British maker.

HAWKES AND SON Saxophone mouthpiece

Hawkes was one of the great innovators of his generation. His designs evince a knowledge of acoustical design equal to much of what is being done today.

He is also important for the mass production techniques that he developed in order to both meet and further the advances made by the industrial revolution. As a consequence he made far more instruments than is usually assumed.

An in depth study of his work has been made with particular regard to the mass production ideas that he put into practice. This mouthpiece has the typical large ballooned out chamber of its time, which was hand crafted for the instrument in question.

BUFFET SOPRANO Saxophone mouthpiece

The Buffet Soprano mouthpiece was a very old but standard type of deign mouthpiece similar to the baritone mouthpiece that we also have by Buffet. An excellent example of the 'classical' approach that was prevalent at the time.

BUFFET BARITONE Saxophone mouthpiece

A standard buffet mouthpiece that produced a classical style round tone for the instrument. No doubt a favourite for playing with classical saxophone quartets-innumerable in France and Belgium similar to the quantity of Brass Bands in England at the same time.